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Happy Campers' Basic Guide to Icelandic

Happy Campers' Basic Guide to Icelandic

Published: 17. March 2017

Isolated and spoken by a population of less than 400,000 individuals, the Icelandic language is a beloved and proud part of Icelandic culture. Standard Icelandic is originally based on the 12th century Old Norse and then somewhat remodelled again in the 19th century by adding and subtracting letters and words. It’s comparable to German, although Icelandic only uses four cases. If you’d like to learn more about the history and intricacies, take a look here.

Icelandic is so rare, a lot of folks I’ve met around the world are amazed Iceland even has its own language! And it happens to be one of the oldest and hardest to master as a foreigner. Fortunately, the locals are also experts in English, a more favourable language amongst travellers, so you can easily get by without trying to pronounce one of those ridiculous volcano names like Eyjafjallajökull*.

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Best Places to See the Northern Lights in Iceland

Best Places to See the Northern Lights in Iceland

Published: 24. February 2015

As an amateur photographer, there's nothing more exciting than capturing the northern lights. I suspect that I'm not alone about that, so I decided to write down my top 16 places to either watch or photograph the northern lights and hopefully you'll find it useful. To see the exact location of each spot, I put together this map.

General Northern Lights Tips

Before going through the list, there are a few general things that you should keep in mind before deciding on the perfect location.

  • Try seeing the northern lights during winter months, and close to midnight (or the darkest part of the day possible)
  • Make sure to bring warm clothes - this will make you more patient, which is crucial when shooting the northern lights
  • Keep the moonlight in mind (is it a full moon?)
  • Bring a sturdy tripod and a remote/cable shutter release trigger if possible
  • Bring a travel chair with you, to be extra comfy
  • Think about your composition and choose your location accordingly
  • Check the road conditions. You don’t want to get stuck somewhere in the middle of nowhere.
  • If you are considering a northern lights tour, I’d recommend reconsidering. You don’t need a ticket to see the northern lights (It’s nature’s gift to everybody!) A little bit of research is all you need.

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